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366 days in Abraham Lincoln's presidency the private, political, and military decisions of America's greatest president / Stephen A. Wynalda.

E-book E-book (c2010.)
Description: 1 online resource : ill.
Publisher: New York : Skyhorse Pub., c2010.

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  • ISBN: 9781602399945
  • ISBN: 1602399948
General Note: "A Herman Graf book."
Bibliography, etc.: Includes bibliographical references and index.
Contents: 1861. January 3: Lincoln vacillates -- A divisive cabinet -- January 11: Lincoln stands firm -- The other thirteenth amendment -- January 12: Visitors -- January 24: "Diamond in the rough" -- Informal wear -- January 28: Inaugural preparations -- January 31: A tearful goodbye -- Sally -- February 6: A last Springfield reception -- What the Lincolns left behind -- February 8: The Lincolns move out -- February 11: Lincoln leaves Springfield -- February 14: Whistle-stops -- February 15: "There is no crisis" -- February 21: The Baltimore plot -- Should Lincoln have been worried? -- February 23: Lincoln's secret train ride -- Lincoln's first day in Washington -- February 27: The old nemesis -- March 5: Anderson's warning -- March 10: Lincoln goes to church -- Praying for the president -- March 12: Surrendering Sumter? -- March 16: Lincoln polls his cabinet -- The surrounded fortress -- March 18: The green president -- March 19: Patronage -- March 29: The commander in chief decides -- March 30: A share in the patronage pie -- April 1: The American prime minister -- Seward's ambition -- April 5: The presidential paycheck -- April 6: To avoid war -- April 13: Sumter falls -- April 17: Virginia secedes from the Union -- The anguished decision -- April 19: The blockade -- Was Lincoln's blockade effective? -- April 21: Washington is isolated -- April 24: The wait -- April 25: Maryland and secession -- April 27: The first suspension of habeas corpus -- April 29: The irregulars -- May 1: The Powhatan fiasco -- Did Lincoln provoke the war? -- May 4: The committee -- May 21: A letter to London -- Thorny relations -- May 24: Elmer Ellsworth -- May 27: The quartermaster general -- May 30: Taney vs. Lincoln -- June 3: "His name fills the nation" -- June 13: The sharpshooters -- June 17: Executive decor -- How bad was the White House? -- June 18: Aerial reconnaissance -- June 22: The daunting task -- June 29: Two plans -- July 20: "You are all green alike" -- July 21: Distant guns -- July 23: A grim reevaluation -- "I believe he would do it" -- July 27: McClellan comes to Washington -- August 2: The picnic -- August 3: Prince Napoleon -- August 5: Income tax -- August 6: Lincoln vs. Congress -- August 15: Missouri's woes -- August 16: Trade across the lines -- August 17: The "coffee-mill gun" -- The father of invention -- August 24: Neutral Kentucky -- August 31: "Our first naval victory" -- September 2: Fremont's proclamation -- September 9: Lincoln sends Fremont help -- September 10: Ironclads -- September 11: "He knows what I want done" -- September 16: The Fremonts vs. the Blairs -- September 30: Political arrests -- Maryland and civil liberties -- October 8: Troop reviews -- October 19: The navy yard -- October 20: Wires that spanned a continent -- October 21: Edward Baker -- October 27: Fremont is dismissed -- Handling Fremont -- November 1: Scott's out, McClellan's in -- Scott vs. McClellan -- November 13: Dodging the president -- November 15: The Trent affair -- Why was recognition of the Confederacy important? -- November 16: The gardener -- Mary's bills -- November 28: Thanksgiving -- November 29: "Chevalier" Wikoff -- December 3: Chaplains -- December 26: Seward's argument --
1862. January 6: Lincoln defends McClellan -- January 10: "The bottom is out of the tub" -- January 13: Lincoln removes Cameron -- Cameron's "shoddy" department -- January 26: The not-so-tenderhearted Lincoln -- January 27: Lincoln demands his armies move -- February 2: Lincoln meets Ralph Waldo Emerson -- Emerson on Lincoln -- February 4: Lincoln refuses a pardon -- February 5: A White House ball -- February 12: Lincoln's sick child -- Willie -- February 16: Fort Donelson surrenders -- February 20: "My boy is gone!" -- February 24: Willie's funeral -- February 25: The national bank -- February 28: McClellan's mistake -- March 6: Compensated emancipation -- Why compensated emancipation failed -- March 9: The CSS Virginia -- March 11: Lincoln demotes McClellan -- March 13: The peninsula campaign begins -- March 14: Seizing neutral ships -- April 9: "But you must act" -- April 10: "Place of peace" -- April 16: Slaves freed in the District of Columbia -- May 5: On the march to Richmond -- May 7: A trip to Fortress Monroe -- May 9: A private little war -- Commander in chief -- May 11: "Norfolk is ours" -- May 15: The Department of Agriculture -- May 16: The general's pet -- McClellan's ego -- May 17: Reinforcements -- May 19: Hunter's emancipation -- Why Lincoln had to be the emancipator -- May 20: The Homestead Act -- May 23: A day at Fredericksburg -- May 25: McDowell is recalled -- May 26: Lincoln protects Cameron's reputation -- Lincoln's magnanimity -- May 28: Three generals -- June 1: "Hold all your ground" -- June 7: "Quiet is very necessary to us" -- June 14: A twenty-dollar fine -- June 15: Fremont's nerves -- The Shenandoah or Richmond? -- June 19: The extension of slavery -- June 20: "Public opinion baths -- His changing mind -- June 23: Advice from an old war horse -- June 25: "I owe no thanks to you" -- July 2: The peninsula campaign ends -- July 9: The "Harrison bar letter" -- July 12: Medal of honor -- July 17: Congress and slavery -- July 22: The preliminary emancipation -- July 28: "Friends who would hold my hands" -- August 4: "Gentlemen, you have my decision" -- What changed his mind -- August 14: An unpopular policy -- Lincoln and colonization -- August 22: "The prayer of twenty millions" -- August 29: Waiting on a victory -- August 30: "Leave Pope to get out of his scrape" -- September 1: "I must have McClellan" -- "Almost ready to hang himself" -- September 5: Bucktails -- Company K -- September 12: "Maryland, my Maryland" -- September 13: A bull against a comet -- September 15: The cigar wrapper -- September 17: Antietam -- September 22: The promise of freedom -- "Queer little conceits" -- September 24: Habeas corpus suspended nationally -- Multiple suspensions -- September 26: "That is not the game" -- September 28: "Breath alone kills no rebels" -- October 2: How the troops felt -- October 3: "McClellan's bodyguard" -- Ditties -- October 4: "No enemies here" -- Mary and the wounded -- October 7: "To hurt the enemy" -- October 12: Buell -- October 14: Tad and the military -- "Cussed Old Abe himself" -- October 17: Lincoln meets Commodore Nutt -- October 24: Lincoln removes Buell -- October 25: The couchant lion -- October 26: Lincoln's purpose -- November 5: "Hard, tough fighting" -- November 7: Ellet's rams -- November 14: A "soldier" or a "housekeeper" -- November 22: "Impedimenta" -- November 26: Missed opportunities -- December 1: The Minnesota Sioux uprising -- December 6: Mercy -- Lincoln and Native Americans -- December 11: Resolutions -- December 12: Fernando Wood -- December 14: Fredericksburg -- December 17: "Lincoln's evil genius" -- The cabinet crisis -- December 20: Cutting the Gordian knot -- December 29: Cabinet meetings -- December 30: "You fail me" -- December 31: The evolving proclamation --
1863. January 1: The Emancipation Proclamation -- January 4: Anti-semitism -- January 5: A bright moment in a dark year -- January 8: Lincoln refuses a resignation -- Resignations -- January 14: Arming black soldiers -- January 18: Churches -- January 19: "The sleeping sentinel" -- Childhood home -- January 21: Too close to McClellan -- January 22: Political generals -- January 25: Hooker replaces Burnside -- February 13: Lincoln meets Tom Thumb -- February 18: The African slave trade -- March 3: Two notorious acts -- March 15: Raiders -- March 20: The banished reporter -- April 7: Princess Salm-Salm -- April 20: West Virginia becomes a state -- April 23: Séances in the White House -- "Long Brave" joins a sé́ance -- April 28: An anxious president -- May 3: Telegrams -- May 6: "What will the country say?" -- "I am down to raisins" -- May 12: Death of a legend -- May 13: Copperheads -- May 14: "I would be very glad of another movement" -- May 22: The Vicksburg siege begins -- May 29: Burnside offers to resign again -- June 2: Grant worries Lincoln -- June 4: Lincoln reopens the Chicago Times -- Lincoln and freedom of the press -- June 5: Lee moves north -- June 9: Nightmares -- Lincoln's dreams -- June 12: The Corning letter -- June 16: Hooker and Halleck -- June 26: Late-night visitors -- June 27: "His own dunghill" -- July 3: A carriage accident -- Threats -- July 4: Gettysburg -- July 5: "The pretended Confederate states" -- July 6: "The whole country is our soil" -- July 7: "Caught the rabbit" -- July 13: Draft riots -- July 14: "Your golden opportunity is gone" -- Could Meade have ended the war? -- July 15: From anger to laughter -- Robert -- July 18: Reviewing courts-martial -- "Leg cases" -- July 24: War widows -- July 25: Routes -- July 29: Caution -- July 30: Order of retaliation -- The "black flag" -- August 1: To "live in history" -- August 7: "Bullocks into a slaughter pen" -- August 9: "The tycoon is in a fine whack" -- The physical man -- August 10: Lincoln meets Frederick Douglass -- August 11: War governors -- August 13: The symbol -- August 20: The telegraph office -- August 26: The Conklin letter -- August 27: Bounty-jumpers -- September 14: The Judiciary vs. the Executive -- September 18: Old friends -- The almanac murder trial -- September 21: "River of death" -- September 25: The rant -- September 27: Reinforcements for Rosecrans -- September 29: Temperance -- October 5: "No friends in Missouri" -- October 6: Grover's National Theater -- October 9: Prison camps -- October 16: The cracker line -- October 18: The chin-fly -- "Pieces upon a chessboard" -- October 23: Murder in Maryland -- October 28: Arming the disloyal -- October 30: Ford's Theatre -- November 2: "I am used to it" -- November 9: Tyrannicide -- November 12: The competition -- November 17: A cemetery in Gettysburg -- November 18: Writing the Gettysburg Address -- November 19: The address -- November 23: Siege at Knoxville -- November 25: Missionary Ridge -- November 27: Sickbed -- Lincoln's health -- December 4: "Pipes" -- December 8: Amnesty and reconstruction -- December 9: Annual message -- December 13: Emilie's visit -- December 16: A rebel in the White House -- December 19: The imperial navy -- Did Russia save the Union? -- December 22: Freedom of religion -- December 23: The storyteller -- The uses of his stories -- December 28: Lincoln's secretaries --
1864. January 7: The butchering business -- "Until further orders" -- January 16: Lincoln meets Anna Dickinson -- January 20: Reconstructing Arkansas -- January 23: The "voluntary labor system" -- January 29: Lincoln sends an emissary south -- February 9: Two photos that become icons -- February 10: Willie's pony dies -- The Lincolns pets -- February 19: The Booths and the Lincolns -- February 22: The Pomeroy circular -- February 29: Lincoln outmaneuvers Chase -- March 1: Grant is promoted -- March 2: Lincoln's memory -- March 7: The Dahlgren conspiracy -- March 8: Lincoln meets Grant -- March 21: Nevada to become a state -- Words that haunted him -- March 24: Failure in Florida -- March 25: "Why should the spirit of mortal be proud?" -- March 28: White House security -- April 3: The Hodges letter -- The doctrine of necessity -- April 18: The Baltimore riot -- April 22: "In God we trust" -- April 26: The presidential office -- April 30: Lincoln meets Elizabeth Cady Stanton -- May 2: An annoyed general -- May 8: "There will be no turning back" -- May 10: Banishing clergy -- May 18: The ruse -- May 31: "About four hundred men" -- June 6: The Baltimore convention -- June 10: Vallindigham returns -- June 11: Lincoln's personal finances -- June 21: "I will go in" -- Casualties of war -- June 24: Disparity -- Racial discrimination -- June 28: Fugitive slave laws -- June 30: Chase loses his job -- Parting ways -- July 1: A new treasury secretary -- July 8: The Wade-Davis bill -- July 10 "Keep cool" -- July 11: Under fire -- July 16: The Niagara Falls peace efforts -- July 19: A riot close to home -- July 26: The Confederates escape again -- July 31: "We sleep at night" -- August 8: The sister-in-law -- Disloyal kin -- August 12: "Let 'em wriggle" -- August 18: "I fear he is a failure" -- August 19: The Robinson letter -- "Damned in time and eternity" -- August 21: Wrought-iron -- August 23: "The tide is against us" -- August 25: "Worse than losing" -- August 28: "Am I to have no rest?" -- The soldiers' home -- September 3: "Damn the torpedoes" -- If Lincoln was not reelected -- September 4: Conscientious objectors -- September 6: Women in the ranks -- September 7: Lincoln and the bible -- What did Lincoln believe? -- September 8: Writing Mary -- September 19: The soldiers' vote -- September 20: "Blows upon a dead body" -- September 23: The deal -- October 1: "The first installment" -- October 10: Cleaning up a piece of ground -- October 11: Reading "balderdash" -- October 13: A close race -- October 15: Citizen Taney -- October 22: Little Phil's ride -- October 29: Lincoln meets Sojourner Truth -- Was Lincoln a racist? -- October 31: Nevada becomes a state -- November 3: Election preparations -- November 4: The transcontinental railroad -- November 8: Reelection -- Mary's bad habit -- November 11: To "save the union" -- November 21: The Bixby letter -- November 24: Edward Bates -- December 2: Prison overpopulation -- Starving prisoners -- December 7: The nominee -- Lincoln's Supreme Court -- December 10: Lincoln and friends -- Was Lincoln a homosexual? -- December 15: George Thomas -- December 21: War democrats -- December 25: The Christmas gift.
1865. January 2 "Marse Linkum" -- January 9: The humblest employee -- January 15: Lincoln meets Jean Agassiz -- January 17: Fort Fisher -- January 30: Peace overtures -- February 1: Lincoln signes the Thirteenth Amendment -- February 3: The Hampton Roads conference -- February 7: "Waiting for the hour" -- February 17: Robert receives his commission -- February 26: "Lots of wisdom in that document -- March 4: Lincoln is inaugurated -- Four years earlier -- March 17: The plot -- Booth's other attempts -- March 22: The abduction -- March 23: The Lincolns head for the front -- March 26: Hackles of the "hellcat" -- Mary's temper -- March 27: The city point conference -- March 31: The beginning of the end -- April 2: "This is victory" -- April 4: Lincoln takes a seat -- April 8: "Let the thing be pressed" -- April 11: Lincoln's last speech -- Why did Booth kill Lincoln? -- April 12: "Giving away the scepter" -- April 14: Lincoln's final day -- "Sic semper tyrannis" -- April 15: "Now he belongs to the ages".
Summary: Journalist Stephen A. Wynalda has constructed a painstakingly detailed day-by-day breakdown of president Abraham Lincoln's decisions in office--including his signing of the Homestead Act on May 20, 1862; his signing of the legislation enacting the first federal income tax on August 5, 1861; and more personal incidents like the day his eleven-year-old son, Willie, died. Revealed are Lincoln's private frustrations on September 28, 1862, as he wrote to vice president Hannibal Hamlin, "The North responds to the [Emancipation] proclamation sufficiently with breath; but breath alone kills no rebels." --from publisher description
Source of Description:
Description based on print version record.
Alternate Title: Three hundred and sixty-six days in Abraham Lincoln's presidency
Citation: Wynalda, Stephen A. "366 days in Abraham Lincoln's presidency the private, political, and military decisions of America's greatest president." New York : Skyhorse Pub., 2010.
Search Results Showing Item 36 of 37

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