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Green / Laura Vaccaro Seeger.

Book Book (2012.)
Description: [36] p. : col. ill. ; 26 cm.
Publisher: New York : Roaring Brook Press, 2012.
23 of 25 copies available at NOBLE (All Libraries).
1 current hold with 25 total copies.
Library Location Call Number Status Due Date
Beverly Bookmobile Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book S (Text to Phone) Available -
Beverly Main Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book SEE (Text to Phone) Available -
Danvers Children's Picture Books JJ / Seeger (Text to Phone) Checked out 12/22/2017
Everett - Parlin Memorial Children's Picture Books E/Seeger (Text to Phone) Available -
Everett - Shute Memorial Children's Picture Books E/Seeger (Text to Phone) Available -
Gloucester Children's Picture Books J/E/ Seeger (Picture Books) (Text to Phone) Available -
Lynn Children's Picture Books j7/Seeger (Text to Phone) Available -
Lynnfield Children's Picture Books Children's Picture Book / Seeger (Text to Phone) Available -
Marblehead Children's Picturebook J EASY SEEGER (Text to Phone) Available -
Melrose Children's Picture Books JE Seeger (Text to Phone) Available -
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  • Awards: Caldecott Honor Book, 2013
    • ISBN: 9781596433977 (hardcover) :
    • ISBN: 1596433973 (hardcover) :
    • Edition: 1st ed.
    General Note: "A Neal Porter Book."
    Summary: Illustrations and simple, rhyming text explore the many shades of the color green. How many kinds of green are there? There's the lush green of a forest on a late spring day, the fresh, juicy green of a just-cut lime, the incandescent green of a firefly, the vivid aquamarine of a tropical sea.
    Authors: Roaring Brook Press. (publisher.).
    • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2012 May #1
      *Starred Review* If you think of green—well, which green are you thinking of? As Seeger shows in her latest beguiling picture book, green is a color that stretches the mind. On the forest green spread, a bunny meanders. Sharp little eyes will spot the cutouts of two leaves on a tree branch. Turn the page, and the leaf cuts have now become small fish on a sea-green spread. With each turn of the page, something becomes something else when viewed through the beautifully designed paper cuts: a night sky becomes a violet; a red barn becomes apples on a tree. The clever transformations extend to letters, too; on one page, Khaki is formed by the jungle fronds of the previous spread. Seeger often varies her artistic style; those expecting the simpler, childlike shapes found in the Dog and Bear books will find a lusher offering here. Water, fruit, forests, and ferns come alive, but although Seeger could have pushed her greens onto a predictable ecological pathway, she doesn't force an environmental message, letting the richness of the natural world speak for itself. Finally, after a white winter, spring comes: a boy plants, a girl gazes, and green, once more, sings its eternal song. This is a book for turning pages, pointing, looking, talking—fun! Copyright 2012 Booklist Reviews.
    • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 2012 March #3

      Seeger's skill at creating simple yet wonderfully effective concept books, as well as her mastery of die-cuts that delight in unexpected and ingenious ways, are in full evidence in this salute to the color green. The gently rhymed verse consists entirely of two-word phrases and begins with a rundown of specific shades ("forest green/ sea green/ lime green/ pea green") before moving into more abstract directions. The turning point: "wacky green," paired with a portrait of a green-and-white zebra shown happily munching grass. Seeger paints thickly on a canvas backdrop that lends an appropriately organic feel, given the natural sources for many of the varieties of green. Throughout, die-cuts of various sizes, shapes, and quantities build surprising connections between adjoining spreads: the words khaki and jungle are hidden within the backgrounds of the other's spread, both made legible by the same rectangular window; a "slow green" inchworm becomes the hook on which hangs a "faded green" sign. There's even room for spreads about the absence of green (a stop sign is "never green"). Here's hoping subsequent color books from Seeger get the green light. Ages 2–6. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (Mar.)

      [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC
    • PW Annex Reviews : Publishers Weekly Annex Reviews

      Seeger's skill at creating simple yet wonderfully effective concept books, as well as her mastery of die-cuts that delight in unexpected and ingenious ways, are in full evidence in this salute to the color green. The gently rhymed verse consists entirely of two-word phrases and begins with a rundown of specific shades ("forest green/ sea green/ lime green/ pea green") before moving into more abstract directions. The turning point: "wacky green," paired with a portrait of a green-and-white zebra shown happily munching grass. Seeger paints thickly on a canvas backdrop that lends an appropriately organic feel, given the natural sources for many of the varieties of green. Throughout, die-cuts of various sizes, shapes, and quantities build surprising connections between adjoining spreads: the words khaki and jungle are hidden within the backgrounds of the other's spread, both made legible by the same rectangular window; a "slow green" inchworm becomes the hook on which hangs a "faded green" sign. There's even room for spreads about the absence of green (a stop sign is "never green"). Here's hoping subsequent color books from Seeger get the green light. Ages 2–6. Agent: Steven Malk, Writers House. (Mar.)

      [Page ]. Copyright 2012 PWxyz LLC
    • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 2012 March

      PreS-Gr 2—Just when it seems that there could not possibly be anything new to present about this trendy color, Seeger creates a tactile treat that yields surprise with every page turn. On a surface that brings its own nubby texture, the thickly applied oils produce luscious scenes, verdant and ripe. As the spreads open, whether the view is of a forest, a still life of limes, or a seascape, each one begs to be touched, and if the eye hasn't spotted the often cleverly concealed diecuts, the hand will find them. Thus the cutout leaves in the "forest green" landscape become the outlines of fish on the next page's "sea green." Sometimes words are disguised in a painting, so "jungle" (green), obvious when seen through the white frame next to a tiger, is camouflaged when the turn reveals Jackson Pollack-style drips across a lizard on the "khaki green" page. Some choices are "wacky": a green zebra. Others give pause; the stop sign is "never" green. The penultimate composition of a child planting a seedling is wordless, inviting listeners, propelled by the internal rhymes, to participate. The conclusion displays a massive trunk leading up to "forever green." Perfectly paced and visually exciting, this title introduces concepts, humor, and the joy of looking to young children; it represents picture book making at its very best.—Wendy Lukehart, Washington DC Public Library

      [Page 135]. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

    Citation:

    Seeger, Laura Vaccaro. "Green." New York : Roaring Brook Press, 2012.

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