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Ten little fingers and ten little toes / Mem Fox ; [illustrations by] Helen Oxenbury.

Fox, Mem, 1946- (Author).
Book Book (2008.)
Description: [40] p. : col. ill. ; 25 x 29 cm.
Publisher: Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, 2008.
23 of 24 copies available at NOBLE (All Libraries).
0 current holds with 24 total copies.
Library Location Call Number Status Due Date
Beverly Farms Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book FOX (Text to Phone) Available -
Beverly Main Children's Story Time Shelf Child Picture Book FOX (Text to Phone) Library Use Only -
Beverly Main Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book FOX (Text to Phone) Available -
Endicott College Juvenile Collection Juv Fic Fox (Text to Phone) Available -
Everett - Parlin Memorial Children's Picture Books E/Fox (Text to Phone) Available -
Everett - Parlin Memorial Children's Picture Books E/Fox (Text to Phone) Available -
Everett - Shute Memorial Children's Picture Books E/Fox (Text to Phone) Available -
Gloucester Children's Picture Books J/E/ fox (Picture Books) (Text to Phone) Available -
Lynnfield Children's Picture Books Children's Picture Book / Fox (Text to Phone) Available -
Marblehead Children's Picturebook J EASY FOX (Text to Phone) Available -
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  • ISBN: 9780152060572 (hardcover) :
  • ISBN: 015206057X (hardcover) :
  • Edition: 1st ed.
Summary: Rhyming text compares babies born in different places and in different circumstances, but they all share the commonality of ten little fingers and ten little toes.
Authors: Oxenbury, Helen, (ill.).
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Reviews 2008 November #2
    *Starred Review* A standout for its beautiful simplicity, this picture-book collaboration between Fox and Oxenbury aims a message of diversity and tolerance at very young children. The first lines set up the text s repetition and rhythm: "There was one little baby who was born far away. And another who was born on the very next day. And both of these babies, as everyone knows, had ten little fingers and ten little toes." The subsequent spreads follow the same theme in similarly bouncing, rhyming lines: babies around the world may be different (one baby is born near ice, another in a desert tent), but the refrain of each baby s 10 fingers and toes reminds us of what we all share. Oxenbury s spare pencil-and-watercolor pictures, set against pure white pages, zero in on pudgy little hands and feet, offering many interactive opportunities for young viewers to point and count. Clusters of adorable multicultural babies from around the world toddle across the pages until just one child receives three kisses on the nose from her loving mom, a sweet gesture that parents will want to act out with their own children. A gentle, joyous offering. Copyright 2008 Booklist Reviews.
  • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 2008 September #3

    Put two titans of kids' books together for the first time, and what do you get (besides the urge to shout, "What took you so long?")? The answer: an instant classic. Fox's (Time for Bed ) text works off the simplest premise: babies around the world, even those who seem like polar opposites, have the same 20 digits in common. But there's real magic at work here. Given their perfect cadences, the rhymes feel as if they always existed in our collective consciousness and were simply waiting to be written down: "There was one little baby who was born far away./ And another who was born on the very next day./ And both of these babies, as everyone knows/ had ten little fingers and ten little toes." Oxenbury (We're Going on a Bear Hunt ) once again makes multiculturalism feel utterly natural and chummy. As her global brood of toddlers grows—she introduces two cast members with every new stanza—readers can savor each addition both as beguiling individualist and giggly, bouncy co-conspirator. Ages 3–5. (Oct.)

    [Page 66]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.
  • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 2008 December

    PreS—"There was one little baby/who was born far away./And another who was born/on the very next day./And both of these babies,/as everyone knows,/had ten little fingers/and ten little toes." So opens this nearly perfect picture book. Fox's simple text lists a variety of pairs of babies, all with the refrain listing the requisite number of digits, and finally ending with the narrator's baby, who is "truly divine" and has fingers, toes, "and three little kisses/on the tip of its nose." Oxenbury's signature multicultural babies people the pages, gathering together and increasing by twos as each pair is introduced. They are distinctive in dress and personality and appear on primarily white backgrounds. The single misstep appears in the picture of the baby who was "born on the ice." The child, who looks to be from Northern Asia or perhaps an Inuit, stands next to a penguin. However, this minor jarring placement does not detract enough from the otherwise ideal marriage of text and artwork to prevent the book from being a first purchase. Whether shared one-on-one or in storytimes, where the large trim size and big, clear images will carry perfectly, this selection is sure to be a hit.—Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT

    [Page 90]. Copyright 2008 Reed Business Information.

Citation:

Fox, Mem. "Ten little fingers and ten little toes." Orlando, Fla. : Harcourt, 2008.

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