Catalog

Record Details

Catalog Search



Daisy comes home / by Jan Brett.

Brett, Jan, 1949- (Author).
Book Book (2002.)
Description: [32] p. : col. ill. ; 26 cm.
Publisher: New York, NY : G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2002.
24 of 25 copies available at NOBLE (All Libraries).
0 current holds with 25 total copies.
Library Location Call Number Status Due Date
Beverly Bookmobile Children's Picture Books Child Easy Book B (Text to Phone) Available -
Beverly Bookmobile Children's Picture Books Child Easy Book B (Text to Phone) Available -
Beverly Farms Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book BRE (Text to Phone) Available -
Beverly Main Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book BRE (Text to Phone) Available -
Beverly Main Children's Picture Books Child Picture Book BRE (Text to Phone) Available -
Danvers Children's Picture Books JJ / Brett (Text to Phone) Available -
Danvers Children's Picture Books JJ / Brett (Text to Phone) Available -
Everett - Parlin Memorial Children's Picture Books E/Brett (Text to Phone) Available -
Gloucester Children's Picture Books J/E/ Brett (Picture Books) (Text to Phone) Available -
Gloucester Children's Picture Books J/E/ Brett (Picture Books) (Text to Phone) Available -
Next 10 »

  • ISBN: 039923618X :
Summary: Daisy, an unhappy hen in China, floats down the river in a basket and has an adventure.
  • Booklist Reviews : Booklist Monthly Selections - #2 March 2002
    /*Starred Review*/ Ages 5-8. Brett, known for her intricate designs and her engaging artwork, outdoes herself in this story set in modern-day China. Young Mei Mei loves taking care of her hens, calling them the happiest hens in China. But one of them, Daisy, is bullied by her coop mates. One night, Daisy floats down the river in a straw basket, and suddenly she must rely on survival skills she didn't know she had. Mei Mei shows her own bravery when she rescues Daisy, who turns up at the local market bound for the kettle, and Daisy proves she can hold her own when she returns to the farm. The story has a strong beginning and end, but it bogs down in the middle. What never flags is the excitement generated by the incredible artwork. Children can see every feather on a hen, each orange in a bin in the marketplace, and every tile on a roof. Brett's attention to detail is matched by her skill in representing the story's viewpoint and movement: spot art on the edge of each page moves the story along or adds a bit of new knowledge. Particularly eye-catching are the richly hued pictures, bursting with Chinese life. The art sets off the story with decorative corners resembling bamboo or woven basketry that further carry out Chinese motifs. ((Reviewed March 15, 2002)) Copyright 2002 Booklist Reviews
  • Publishers Weekly Reviews : PW Reviews 2001 December #1
    Inspired in part by the classic story of Ping, the adventurous young duck on the Yangtze River, Brett's (The Mitten) spirited, intricately illustrated tale centers on Daisy, the smallest of Mei Mei's six hens. Escaping the taunts of the larger hens, the beleaguered creature leaves the henhouse one rainy night tosleep in an egg basket at the edge of the Li River. But soon the rising water reaches the basket, and the current sweeps Daisy downstream. While a distraught Mei Mei searches for her, Daisy encounters (and cleverly escapes from) a dog, a water buffalo and a troop of monkeys before being snatched up by a fisherman who can't wait to sell her at market. Mei Mei's nick-of-time rescue of Daisy will bring smiles to young faces as will Daisy's new status in the hen house. In the main frame of each paneled spread, Brett depicts in fine detail the diverse wildlife and lush vegetation found along the Li, while smaller images in the corners amplify elements of the plot. Incorporating simulated bamboo patterns, basket weaves and painted pottery, the artist's trademark borders and embellishments intriguingly evoke the timeless setting. The elegance of the illustrations gains a touch of whimsy as Brett hides some surprises in the distant mountains. Ages 4-8. (Feb.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
  • School Library Journal Reviews : SLJ Reviews 2002 March
    PreS-Gr 3-In a tale reminiscent of Marjorie Flack's The Story about Ping (Viking, 1933), the smallest hen in Mei Mei's chicken house can't compete each evening for her spot on the perch. One rainy night, Daisy decides to sleep outside, and she settles down in one of Mei Mei's market baskets, which is picked up by the rain-swollen Li River. Carried downstream, she has many adventures until she is caught by an enterprising fisherman who plans to sell her in the market. Of course, she is rescued by her determined owner in a daring escape scene. Brett's tale is clever and contains many authentic elements-varied Chinese people in modern clothing, fruits and vegetables, typical architecture from the area, etc. However, some of the market scenes are a bit old-fashioned, and not all of the Chinese characters on the baskets are correct. As is typical of Brett's work, the pages are full of detail and often overdecorative, and the small pictures in the slanting sidebars distract from the dramatic, bold watercolors. The karsts, oddly shaped mountains found near the Li River, are drawn to resemble animals, which takes attention away from the main focus of the illustrations. Still, this lively story will be popular with young readers who won't mind a tale that reflects China as seen by an admiring American visitor.-Barbara Scotto, Michael Driscoll School, Brookline, MA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.

Citation:

Brett, Jan. "Daisy comes home." New York, NY : G. P. Putnam's Sons, 2002.

Additional Resources